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History Snippets

The Necessity of Art 

Here are the thoughts from a student, written in the Iris  in December 1925 about art. Mary has also added something about music, 'crawling, whining, popular songs', as opposed to 'healthy songs and music'. I wonder what she meant?

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager

The Necessity of Art 

To many people the word 'art' conveys only a thought of symphony concerts and picture galleries to be indulged in by those who have the time, money and inclination; but art is a necessity, not a luxury. Its aim is always that of expression in terms of beauty, for 'the highest cannot be spoken,' and so it uses form, colour, proportion and harmony to express itself. Art is the sole means of handing down to posterity the beauty and meaning of life, for only the really artistic things survive the ages; all else is lost in time. 

There is no question of ugliness in Nature's world; everything is beautiful, and when we surround men with artificial ugliness we take away a precious gift.

Character depends a great deal on the things seen during life and if people grow up accustomed to ugliness their whole attitude towards mankind will be warped and sordid. As long as unsightly buildings, stupid inane posters and crawling, whining, popular songs remain we are not an artistic race. 

It is extremely important that art should play a greater part in the home than it does at present, but first, more artistic houses must be built. If the exterior were beautiful, it would follow that most people would wish to make the interior equally attractive. Much could be done to improve the indoor decorative schemes, with brighter and more beautiful wall-paper and good pictures glowing with colour to adorn and not cover the walls. Healthy songs and music fill the home with joy and harmony and books will "charm magic casements" in boundless fairy lands.  

Mary Selway (Form U. IVa.)

 

A War-time day in London 

For many of you travelling into an empty central London during 'lockdown', this piece from the 1940 edition of Iris recalls how London coped during World War II. The subtitle is "LONDON CARRIES ON - CARRY ON LONDON!” and I am sure we can all agree and hope that London returns to normal, sooner rather than later.

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager

A WAR-TIME DAY IN LONDON. 

"Coo! London ain't 'arf got it awful!" . . . Thus quoth a charwoman, "My sister's young man's uncle told Edie the other day that it was right down to the ground, not a buildin' standin' at all: don't it seem a shaime ?" . . . 

London in ruins? Could it be true? Having heard the preceding conversation, I decided to investigate matters for myself. 

I chose a beautifully clear day for my trip -"nice day for raiders", as I heard one man remark. Sure enough he was right; before I had been in London ten minutes the siren sounded. I had wondered whether people bothered to shelter if caught in the City during an "Alert"; they do not, but just carry on with their normal work - no fuss, no hurry - just calmness and cheerfulness. 

I passed along Fleet Street, and eventually came out to the river which, incidentally, has risen slightly and is considerably dirtier owing to the cleared-up rubbish having been deposited here! 

My ultimate aim being Oxford Circus, I boarded a 'bus (which took twenty-five minutes to reach its goal, owing to some streets being closed). Boom I Boom! Bang! Oh, of course, the warning is still in progress: that's sent the raider away, thank goodness! What's that? Do we want to get out and shelter? No, thanks, we'll chance it! Good, there goes the “All clear". 

Arrived at the Circus, I looked across the road, only to see a skeleton of a shop - no windows, no doors, no front walls, and piles of cement all over the pavement. What a pity, all those goods wasted and the assistants out of work. But wait a minute, here's a notice: "Hitler's broken our glass, but not our spirit!” Here was surely courage, pluck and perseverance! 

I saw hundreds of cheerful soldiers, English, French, Australians and New Zealanders, clearing up the damage, though they seemed to have plenty of time for calling out various remarks to passers-by. Every few minutes can be heard a furious ringing of horrible-sounding gongs. This means all traffic must clear off the roads, because the valiant men of the “Bomb Disposal Squad" have retrieved another Delayed Action Bomb, and are taking it to an open space before blowing it up.  

"Walking back along the side streets, I met a flower-seller, who said to me, "Yus, Miss. I've lorst me 'ome. I've lorst all me money, but I thank Gawd I'm still 'ere, and so's me Missus. I've 'eard one of me sons 'as bin killed at sea, but I still have two left who are quite O.K., so I can't really grumble!" This seems to be the typical attitude of the Londoner today, feeling fortunate to be alive. 

Some rather amusing effects have been created - in one sense amusing, although heart-breaking in another. In Holborn, for example, only one inner wall of a five-storey building is left standing, and on a shelf on the 4th floor are piles of boxes neatly packed up, with a calendar hanging above the fire-place. . . clothes of various descriptions hanging from iron girders above the pavement . . . and ducks swimming unconcernedly in a bomb crater full of water! 

The damage done to the Middle Temple - which can never be repaired - was the saddest thing I saw: its famous library is also badly damaged. 

Seeing St. Paul's as it always has stood, outlined against the sky, was the scene which seemed to me to be the most wonderful, and the one for which to be the most thankful, when we remember how very near we did actually come to losing it. Without St. Paul's London would not have the same atmosphere. Certainly those valiant men in their khaki uniforms with the red badges of the B.D.S. deserve all our praise. 

My day in London under War circumstances was an enjoyable experience; one I would not have wished to miss. There is a saying which aptly expresses my feelings: 

"LONDON CARRIES ON - CARRY ON LONDON!” 

Vera Lee (O.G.)

More information about the attacks on Middle Temple

The restoration of Inner Temple 

The League of Nations Union 

Iris 1937 by Valerie Gardiner, VI

Our school has a long association with campaigning for peace. In the 1931 Iris magazine, it was recorded that the school formed a school branch of the League of Nations Union,

"because we are convinced that the solution of the world's difficulties will only be found through international good-will and that the future of the League of Nations depends on the good-will of the rising generation"

I think we can all agree with this statement.

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager

My Dog 

You only have to take a short walk to realise that since lockdown there has been a marked increase in the local dog population. Here is a poem from the 1930 Iris magazine about the problems of owning a dog!  

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager

My Dog

My little dog is black and white; 
I teach him tricks each day, 
But when he hears the cats miaow, 
He runs outside to play. 

My little dog is very bad, 
But really I must own, 
That if you had my little dog, 
He would not stay at home.

My little dog went out one day, 
The river for to see, 
But sad to say he lost his way, 
And I found him in the Lea. 

MAISIE PEARL (Form II)

 

The House 

The oldest building on our site is the ‘House’, formerly a Vicarage built in 1906. Our school moved to the site in 1912 and shared the grounds with the Vicar until the 1960’s. The Rev. Herbert Dudley Lampen, Vicar of Walthamstow, moved into the ‘House’ in 1907. During World War I he served with the 7th Battalion, Essex Regiment. He had 4 children, Graham Dudley, born in 1899, who became the Governor of Darfur in Sudan, David Lampen, born in 1904, Edith Barkley (named after her mother’s family) and twins Miriam and Francis, born in 1908. 

‘Iris’, our school magazine has information about the family's involvement in the life of our school. His daughters Edith and Miriam were both pupils.  Edith (Edie) Lampen gave a talk at the Empire Day assembly on the theme of trees and birds. Miriam and Edith were Prefects in 1921 and 1923. Anna Lampen, their mother, as well as their father, presented awards at Prize Giving Day. Their brother Francis followed in his grandfather’s and father’s footsteps and became a Vicar.  

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager

Edith Lampen,
born 1904

 

Miriam Lampen,
born 1908

 

Francis Lampen,
born 1908.  
He went on to become the Vicar of Walthamstow.

 

Handbook for Parents 1986 

We would like to thank Kim Baker, a former student who is a violin maker living in Germany, who has kindly donated to our archives several items of her time at the school. Including the ‘Handbook for Parents’ from 1986.  The transition year from Walthamstow Senior High School to Walthamstow School for Girls.

The aims of the school, as published in the handbook, are still as important and relevant today:

  • To ensure that pupils achieve the highest academic standards of which they are capable.
  • To provide a wide range of educational experiences for every pupil in a school environment that is welcoming, exciting and interesting, as well as academically rewarding.
  • To provide opportunities for the spiritual and moral development of pupils.
  • To promote social responsibility and awareness among pupils so that  they are able to become alert and critical citizens with a strong sense of justice and equality.
  • To ensure positive acceptance of ethnic diversity and opposition to all forms of racism.
  • To promote self-esteem among pupils particularly concerning themselves as women with positive aspirations and confident of equal opportunities both in education and society.
  • To develop mutually beneficial relationships with parents and the local   community.
  • To afford maximum opportunity for the professional development of all members of staff.

School Uniform 

A recent letter to parents mentioning adherence to our school uniform, has allowed me to raid the school archive for items about previous school uniforms.

As you can see in the advert for Henry Taylor from 1958, the raincoats were extremely formal. I have also included articles from the 1937 edition of ‘Iris’, our school magazine, one describing the problem with leg wear and the other about trends in fashion.

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager

To a School Girl a Hundred Years Hence. (Iris School Magazine, 1937).

WSFG School Uniform 1930

As each spring brings new flowers into the world,  flowers like those of the years before, yet always a little altered, so each generation of school girls has its own fashions, ambitions, enthusiasms and slang. In the nineteen thirties one performed handstands, wore one's hat brim turned down all round, built grasshouses beneath the elm trees by the hockey field and described most pleasant things as "ripping."

These are the details of school life that alter, but the nineties, the tens, the teens, the twenties and the forties all had their counterparts. This, then, is the spirit of the school, that each decade, each year, each day, brings its new problems and interests, yet should it be possible for three girls, one of Miss Hewett's first young ladies, a fourth former of to-day and some fourteen year old of the year 2050, to step out of time and meet together in the entrance hall, it would not, after the first excited comparisons of clothes and surroundings, be their great differences that would surprise them, but the tremendous and amazing amount they had in common.

Sylvia M. Gould


Ladders

Inspired by the arrival of the Sub-Editor's letter while mending yet another ladder. 

One often hears the phrase "the good old days" decried and disproved, but our grandmothers had one advantage over us emancipated moderns. They wore skirts which hid their stockings!

And the stockings were black woollen, which could be darned to the last shred! Stockings are a perpetual bane from the moment one leaves off socks until one grows too old to bother and gives up the hopeless struggle. Oh! those long black gym-stockings we wore-they were either too long or too short. If they were too long, we tugged them up and pulled holes (potato size) in the tops, and if they were too short, suspenders did the same for us, However, we must have had a fondness for them, because we wore them even to parties, not caring for black silk, and light ones being more or less unheard of. I wonder how many remember the storm aroused about twelve years ago over the query of whether light stockings should or could be worn with school uniform. 

And now, when we have put away childish things many years ago, the curse is still upon us. We are told to buy more than one pair at a time because if one goes, we can match up the partner. This works excellently in theory but not in practice, because the whole lot goes. 

One of Summer's chiefest blessings is that one's hosiery can be discarded, but even so one must admit that it makes very little difference to one's purse or leisure, which still seems to be filled with mending ladders. 

I am thinking of starting a "Back to Black Stockings and Longer Skirts" movement, but I fear that the manufacturers would have me locked away, so, I suppose, being a moral coward, I shall still go on buying several pairs of the same shade, ad lib, and I expect you will too! 

C. Pettit (Old Girls Association) 

WSFG School Uniform 2020

 

Our Carefree Youth
 

Here is a poem from the December 1927 Iris magazine, which many of our current students taking exams and tests will be able to relate to. The title is ironic, as you will see when you read the poem.

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager

"Our Carefree Youth."

LAST night we decided to get up at five

And 'swot-up' some words that from Latin derive,

Prepare last week's history, an essay to write,

To translate some French at the very first sight,

To juggle with x's, with y's and with z's,

And generally cudgel our sleepy young heads.

Alas! though at eight the alarm clock went off,

We shiver and growl as our nightdress we doff.

Five minutes for breakfast, no more can we stay,

We put on our hats and then run all the way.

We think of the test we've been promised to do

In Latin, and English and Arithmetic too.

We shudder and groan as we enter the room,

“Rough note-books and pencils” – those words full of doom;

Well-known and expected they fall on our ears,

As hopeless and helpless we burst into tears.    

G. McFarlane (Va)

Fresh Air
 

During the finer weather, our school introduces a 'Fresh Air Day' once a week for each year group. This is so that students can enjoy our fantastic outdoor spaces that we are fortunate to have at this school. In 1946, Miss Norris, the Headteacher also believed in the benefits of fresh air. However, one of the students, Olive Blanche Cole, voiced her protest in a witty poem in the Iris magazine. It should be noted that this poem was set, indoors and during the winter!

Quite appropriate in these present times.

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager

Wot! No Air?

Sitting down to Latin once, upon a frosty morn,

Door shut, windows shut, and looking quite forlorn,

Meekly Upper Four H Form were waiting for their Head,

With heavy minds, sleepy brains, and hearts like lumps of lead.

Along there came Miss Norris, gave the comfy girls a scare,

Threw them a reproachful glance and then said, "Wot, no air!

Open up the windows, girls, then throw wide open the door,

A stuffy room breeds lots of germs, I've told you so before."

Sitting with their teeth now dancing in their heads,

With rosy visions of a future spent in sick-room beds.

All the girls of Upper H Form, vow resolvedly

To take their dose of morning air in smaller quantity.

A warning to all mistresses, while I have room to tell,

Be sure when killing nasty germs, you don't kill girls as well.

O. Cole, Upper IV. H.

 

Medical Alumnae
 

Continuing our theme of ‘Honouring our Women of Medicine’, many of our students no longer with us went on to work in the field of medicine. As a tribute to those still working to support us during this period, I thought I would share some of their stories.

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager

Honouring our Women of Medicine

Margaret Witt, 1930-2005

Margaret was born on 14 June 1930 in Leyton, daughter of Henry, a mechanic and chauffeur, and Bertha, a former lady’s companion. In 1941, she won a state scholarship to study at our school and in 1949 she also won a scholarship to study medicine at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, the only woman applicant out of 80 men.

Margaret was a consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist at the North Middlesex Hospital, London. She won the treasurer’s prize in practical anatomy, the Harvey prize in practical physiology, the university scholarship in science (physiology), and the Mathew Duncan gold medal and prize in obstetric medicine. She became the first female registrar in obstetrics and gynaecology at St. Bartholomew’s hospital.

Margaret Witt never married. She had a zest for life, enjoying cooking, entertaining, fashion and travel, as well as music and the theatre. A colleague once said teasingly that: “Margaret was the only person who would take two fur coats, enough jewels to rival the Queen, and half a dozen pairs of shoes for a weekend conference in Paris.” She was a governor of Connaught School for Girls, where a silver cup was dedicated to her memory for the girl who achieved the highest all round points in the year, and a bench placed in the playground. She died on 30 October 2005. 

In 1957, despite her busy career she still took time to be on the committee of the Old Girl’s Association at our school.

Her name is recorded on the Honours Board in Hewett Hall.


Daisy and Jessie Foxon - Nurses in World War I

Jessie wrote a letter from France in 1915, about her nursing experiences during the war. Both sisters, Jessie and Daisy were awarded medals for their work.

The Foxon family, including the boys, attended our school from when it was founded in 1890 and involved themselves in various capacities until the 1950’s.

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager

Daisy writes to me from Malta, she seems to be having a very tame time, hardly any wounded, nearly all medical cases, and not at all busy yet. I dare say they will be later on, although it's hardly human to want to be busy under the circumstances. 

I am at E__s with No. 26, composed chiefly of nursing sisters trained at Guy's……. We have over 1,000 beds in our hospital, and during a rush we take in convoys of varying numbers, mostly between one and two hundred, and evacuate them for Hospital Ship and Belati (India), which the men always call "Blighty."  During the last attack by us we seemed to take in and evacuate every day, and all this trying business was accomplished by the night staff. As I was on night duty then I can assure you it was very hard work and I had over 100 quite badly wounded men under my care.

N.B. - Jessie Foxon is now at Salonika. In spite of poisonous mosquitos and shells bursting 200 yards off her she is in good health and says the shells are a most interesting sight to watch in  the afternoon. 

 

Honouring our Women of Medicine
 

Our school was founded in 1890 and stories of the women who attended our school are recorded in our school magazine, ‘Iris’, which was started in 1906. Many of our students went on to work in the field of medicine and as a tribute to those still working to support us during this period, I thought I would share some of their stories. 

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager


Hilda Kate Whittingham, O.B.E. M.B. Lond. D.P.H., 1876-1965

Hilda qualified as a Doctor in 1903 and went on to work at the London School of Medicine for Women and the ​Royal Free Hospital.  Her father, William Whittingham, was the person responsible for setting up our school and interviewed our first Head, Miss Hewett. Her family home was Comely Bank, which is now the site of a health centre. Hilda and her sister Maggie are one of the first names listed on our Honours Board in Hewett Hall. 

During the 1914-18 war she worked with the bacteriological and hygiene section of the Royal Army Medical College at Millbank. She was awarded an O.B.E. for her work during the war years. In 1917 she became the first pathologist of the South London Hospital for Women, and she worked there for the next 30 years. Sadly, her brother and brother-in-law were both killed during the war. A friend remarked that she was ‘an enthusiast and a perfectionist and her love of life was infectious’.  

 


Margaret Witt, 1930-2005

Margaret was born on 14 June 1930 in Leyton, daughter of Henry, a mechanic and chauffeur, and Bertha, a former lady’s companion. In 1941, she won a state scholarship to study at our school and in 1949 she also won a scholarship to study medicine at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, the only woman applicant out of 80 men. Margaret was a consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist at the North Middlesex Hospital, London. She won the treasurer’s prize in practical anatomy, the Harvey prize in practical physiology, the university scholarship in science (physiology), and the Mathew Duncan gold medal and prize in obstetric medicine. She became the first female registrar in obstetrics and gynaecology at St. Bartholomew’s hospital.  

Margaret Witt never married. She had a zest for life, enjoying cooking, entertaining, fashion and travel, as well as music and the theatre. A colleague once said teasingly that: “Margaret was the only person who would take two fur coats, enough jewels to rival the Queen, and half a dozen pairs of shoes for a weekend conference in Paris.” She was a governor of Connaught School for Girls, where a silver cup was dedicated to her memory for the girl who achieved the highest all round points in the year, and a bench placed in the playground. She died on 30 October 2005.  

In 1957, despite her busy career she still took time to be on the committee of the Old Girl’s Association at our school. Her name is recorded on the Honours Board in Hewett Hall. 

            


Daisy and Jessie Foxon - Nurses in World War I 

Jessie wrote a letter from France in 1915, about her nursing experiences during the war. Both sisters were awarded medals for their work.  

The Foxon family, including the boys, attended our school from its founding in 1890 and involved themselves in various capacities until the 1950’s. 

Daisy writes to me from Malta, she seems to be having a very tame time, hardly any wounded, nearly all medical cases, and not at all busy yet. I dare say they will be later on, although it's hardly human to want to be busy under the circumstances.  

I am at E__s with No. 26, composed chiefly of nursing sisters trained at Guy's……. We have over 1,000 beds in our hospital, and during a rush we take in convoys of varying numbers, mostly between one and two hundred, and evacuate them for Hospital Ship and Belati (India), which the men always call "Blighty."  During the last attack by us we seemed to take in and evacuate every day, and all this trying business was accomplished by the night staff. As I was on night duty then I can assure you it was very hard work and I had over 100 quite badly wounded men under my care.  

N.B. - Jessie Foxon is now at Salonika. In spite of poisonous mosquitos and shells bursting 200 yards off her she is in good health and says the shells are a most interesting sight to watch in the afternoon.  


Dr. Ruth O’Dell (née Licence), MB, M CH, MRCS, LRCP - Student 1934-1942

When Ruth qualified as a doctor, our school was given a half day holiday, to celebrate her appointment as Junior House Surgeon at the Royal Free Hospital. The hospital was recognised at the time as a medical training school for women.

Here are some extracts from an article about her experiences during World War II:

At the end of August 1939, when I was sixteen, my family and I were on holiday in Guernsey, and because my Father was a teacher at Shoreditch Central School, we had to cut our holiday short so that he could report to his school for evacuation.

I was evacuated for 3 years with my school and won a scholarship place at Cambridge to do Medicine, where I completed a 2nd MB. I then went to the Royal Free Hospital for another 3 years to qualify as a doctor.

In early 1945 a bomb fell on the medical school and as I was then doing a surgical course, I was up all night assisting the surgeons operating on the casualties. My parents returned to Walthamstow after about 2 years of war, because so many children didn't want to remain evacuated because fewer bombs were falling. When bombing did start again, my parents used their coal cellar as an air-raid shelter and had beds down there for when the sirens went.

Ruth continued to keep in contact with our school and the picture below is from 2011.

One for the Petrolheads ...
 

Here is a poem from the 1957 Iris magazine which may only be understood by the parents or grandparents of our current students, or vintage car enthusiasts. See how many names of cars are mentioned in this very clever poem by Lorna Rowe, who was aged 14 at the time of writing this poem.

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager

From the Sublime to the Ridiculous

"By Jove!" said Zens, "the time is late,
Our chariots are out of date­
Di immortales, let us go
To the Earls Court Motor Show!"
So now his lordship doth rejoice
In a stately Rolls-Royce;
But Mars, who found the Rolls "too fiddly"
Invested in an Armstrong-Siddely;
Appollo scans the Zodiac
From a speeding Cadillac;
Neptune watches o’er the deep
From a Naval jeep;
Silvanns liked to take things gently,
So bought an antiquated Bentley,
Mithras rattled through the heaven
In an ancient Austin Seven;
Bacchus' Ford was confiscated
For "driving while intoxicated,"
Hermes, cop on his daily rota,
Sports a streamlined Singer Motor.
Vulcan's Vanguard caused some fear
By reversing in top gear.
Poor Cupid could not see quite straight,
And put his brakes on far too late­-
His splendid Jaguar Mark Six
Is bogged down in the river Styx;
Morpheus, the god of slumber,
Went to bed inside his Humber.
Godesses, not to be outdone,
Decided they would join the fun;
Diana her pot shots doth take
From a sturdy shooting brake.
Athene's taste was somewhat finer­-
Her savings bought a Morris Minor;
Psyche, in her Hillman Minx
With Aesculapins had high jinx­-
(the latter, now a "flying doctor"
Does his rounds by helicopter).
The reckless driver's perfect dream-­
No Zebras, police, or "one way stream,"
Till Pluto, full of rage and spite,
Made an Olympian traffic light
And on the great Olympian Way
Put "NO THROUGH ROAD-SOME OTHER DAY!"

Lorna Rowe, VI

Junior League of Nations 

The League of Nations was set up after World War I, to seek an ending of war.

Our school set up a Junior League of Nations Union in 1931 and this is how it was introduced to the school:

We have formed a School Branch of the League of Nations Union; we have done this because we are convinced that the solution of the world's difficulties will only be found through international good-will and that the future of the League of Nations depends on the good-will of the rising generation. 

Here is an illustration by Valerie Gardner from the 1937 edition of the Iris magazine, which I hope will complement the powerful poetry of our current Year 8 students

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager

 

Our School Bells
 

Our school bells are not being used at the present time and I was just wondering whether we were missing them? 

Here is a piece from the 1920 edition of our school magazine ‘Iris', describing the love/hate relationship that a student felt towards the school bell.

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager

An Address to the School Bell 

We have heard thee oh Bell! in the mornings when we were panting for breath in the cloakrooms, and when our unmarked footwear was lost behind the dusty boot-lockers. Twice hast thou called in a harsh voice, "Hurry, thou daughters of laziness, 'tis time for work!" Then have we hated thee, and have muttered things about thee. 

When our brains were hard pressed, and we sighed for thee, then didst thou keep unwanted silence. It seemed the minutes were tied down with leaden strings and thou rangst not. How wearily we waited, and how great was our agony until thou hast cleft the silence with thy welcome voice, oh, longed - for Bell! 

We have heard thee when the sun shone brightly, and when the bell was our companion. Ah! how grating was thy call, - "Come in at once, ye maidens, cease your play." A subdued triumph lurked in thy unwelcome note, oh hated Bell! 

Oh! thou herald of all school functions! how mingled are our feelings toward thee! "Sometimes we would gild thee in honour, to show our love for thee, oft we would fain smash thy works - yet more in sorrow than in anger, for thou art one of the things that must be, and that ever shall be! Oh Bell! 

E Foster, Form VI

 

Remembrance
 

The First World War deeply affected people long after it had ended. Here is a poem by a student, Olive Baker, written in the 1933 school magazine ‘Iris’, which remembers those people who died.

THANK God for peaceful England, this dear isle;
For England's quiet green beauty and her fame;
For her never-failing honour, and her ever-glorious name,
Which still doth stand though nations fall the while.

Remember! Only nineteen years ago,
The roll of war's dread thunder filled the air,
And ev'ry home was called upon to spare
Her father and her sons, to fight the foe.

Think, that the flower of all this nation,
And the good, were laid 'neath alien sod.
And for them England now gives thanks to God.

So while we in security may dwell
Remember still those sons who fought and died For England's noble glory and her pride.

Olive Baker (Form VI)

Brave New World 

With the modern TV adaptation of the Aldous Huxley book ‘Brave New World’ now showing, I thought I would share with you an illustration from the 1964 edition of ‘Iris’, our school magazine. Ann Giles was aged 14 when she submitted this illustration and she had many more illustrations in other copies of the magazine, all of them equally impressive.  

Our school magazine was produced every year (apart from 1917-1920) from 1906 to 1974 and included articles and illustrations from students, staff and former students. 

Mrs Kelly
LRC Manager